Tag Archives: best sales presentations

Are you old-school or new-age sales?

Technology sales personIf I was evaluating a technology-based sales person with a lengthy resume, I would base it on more recent sales history – no farther back than the last 10-15 years. Back 20+ years ago computer and technology sales people could boast big impressive sales numbers because sales were “easy” compared to selling in today’s  highly competitive marketplace. Why? The world was switching over from paper and fax machines to computers and networks. Plus, connecting to the early stages of the Internet. Every company was buying technology and computer related products.

Back then the sales approach was totally different – you could make an easy sale on computers and networks based on price or superior technology because it was changing so quickly. Companies were buying entire telecommunications and computers systems – they were all basically building from scratch.

computer sales

Now successful new-age sales sells the “value” of a company’s technology – because there isn’t as much difference between the competition as there was in the early technology days. Yes, most companies now think they have something new and different, but typically not different enough for the customer to recognize or understand the difference without a lot of marketing and sales communication.

A new-age sales person articulates value propositions and creates the perception in the customer’s mind that the product and company is unique and offers a better value than the competition. That takes additional time, effort, and patience

best selling tipsAdditionally, it is equally important for the new-age sales person to partner with marketing because a successful sales person is part of the sales process and not the whole process. They are patient and learn how to become an important part of the “social media engagement” process. The new-age sales person understands how social media marketing and a company’s website are now an integral part of the entire sales process, as they are not the lone-wolf sales person glad-handing and selling like the good ole’ days.

Identify Who You are Presenting to – Part 3 of 3

Screen Shot 2014-07-29 at 7.03.59 PMThe third type of listener I have identified are people-personsPeople who fall into this category are relationship-based, make decisions and behave based upon the way something feels to them. They buy-into people first, and prefer creating relationships based on trust. You could also call them touchy-feely people. They can be loyal customers, and buy from you because of how they feel about you and your company.

People-persons assimilate information through their sense of touch. And because of this, they rely on more on their physical senses. As an example, they are typically known to acquire a physical skill faster than the average person – observe if they fiddle with pens, paper and other objects as they talk. Do they intermix business with social discussions about family, and organizations they belong too?

Common phrases that you may hear from people-persons are like “that person or company is all washed up”. They may also use phrases like, “I feel your frustration” or “that feels right”.

They also like to give analogies that relate to the way they feel about things that happen to them. As an example, instead of saying, “I was really mad”, they would say something like “my blood was boiling”.

The key to engaging this kind of prospect is to build a relationship. Give them things to touch and hold – like your product or even a part of something bigger which you sell that helps you communicate the quality and value of your product. Once you make a people-persons connection with them, it lowers their guard and makes them more receptive to your presentation.

Sales and marketing presentationsOne of the most effective ways to build a relationship with any type of person is by determining which way a person best listens and relates to you. Aside from understanding your message more clearly, they will also feel naturally connected to you as people generally feel bonded or connected to those that remind them of themselves or those with whom they have things in common with.

The next time you begin a conversation with a prospective customer, start paying attention to the way they communicate. You’ll begin to notice that people generally fall into the visual, auditory or people-persons categories. Then as you move along through your sales and relationship building processes, you will be better equipped to communicate with your future customers.

Sales presentations and marketing effectivenessNow there will be times where people overlap some of the different listening and comprehension styles, but generally there is one dominant system that controls their outlook on life. If you need help tweaking your current sales presentation to appeal to the listening and comprehension styles of different prospects, click here to send me an inquiring email.

Creating more effective sales presentations: Part 2 of 3.

The next customer types are the auditory people. Auditory people absorb information by listening – they need to be able to clearly hear what it is that they are being told. They will look you directly in the eyes to hear you better, where as visual people are looking around, searching for visual cues so they can comprehend better.Sales presentations

Auditory people enjoy talking with others and conversation is something that they find very interesting. They might lean forward to engage you, just to test and hear if what you are saying is true. They will remember what you say – and possibly challenge verbal claims you make, later on in your presentation. So dial down the BS button with these folks.

Auditory people like to use phrases like, “that sounds good”, “that is clear as a bell” and “listen to me”.

Simply put, auditory people understand spoken language more than anything else. Therefore, when making a presentation to them, focus more on your verbal part of the presentation, (and with less speaker prompts to guide you, you will need to know your product benefits better). Verbally communicate your 5-7 main benefits (or value propositions). Tell them what you plan to tell them using a verbal roadmap of where you are going with your presentation. Writing things down or trying to create a vision for them may appear condescending to them.

If your website has videos describing your product, service, and other values, that can play an important part of your sales process – they will have other people in your company to listen too that tells them the story of your company and its products. Click here for an example of a video I created for a website that communicates directly to an auditory type person.

For auditory people their world is represented by sound, therefore, to get their attention and engage them, you must say something that sounds very appealing to them. Also make sure you clearly annunciate and be careful with embellishment – this group “hears” right through the BS.

Just as visual people like to look at directions, auditory people would rather hear directions read out loud by someone else, because retaining information by looking at it can be difficult for them, whereas hearing is better comprehension for them. If they are that type of listener, don’t waste your marketing budget dollars leaving behind your standard folder full of literature – ask if there is anything else they need, and listen to them like they listen to you.